Contact: Joe Vargo, Perris Public Information Officer
Phone: 951-956-2120
jvargo@cityofperris.org

Bio-Swale Landscaping Conserves Water

Perris Public Workers inspector Allen Yun examines a low-flow water sprinkler designed to reduce consumption at a City project on Placentia Avenue.
Perris Public Workers inspector Allen Yun examines a low-flow water sprinkler designed to reduce consumption at a City project on Placentia Avenue.

A drainage area meant to naturally filter water before it entered the storm drain system had instead become a big siphon.

The drainage ditch, technically called a “bio-swale,” was installed in a Perris subdivision to filter runoff. But the grassy area developed a full-time thirst so City officials decided to turn down the tap.

By replacing the turf with drought-resistant shrubs and ground covering, installing low-volume sprinklers and monitoring overall water usage, the bio-swale at Perris Boulevard and Placentia Avenue now uses between 35 and 40 percent less water.
That’s a savings of thousands of gallons every month while maintaining its eye-pleasing appearance.

“In this day and age, water is such a vital resource we simply cannot be overusing it,” said Allen Yun, Special District Inspector for the City’s Public Works Department.  “We want to keep this area looking beautiful while we conserve water.”

Yun and Public Works Maintenance Crew Leader Arturo Garcia worked under the direction of Assistant City Manager Ron Carr and Public Works Manager Daryl Hartwill to transform the swale. Rainwater and run off from the nearby housing tract moves through the swale which acts as a natural purifier. The City also teamed up with Eastern Municipal Water District as it switched from turf to more water-saving plants. As part of its commitment to keeping Perris as water-friendly as possible, City workers are monitoring consumption at other municipal sites, Yun said.

“It’s nice to be able to help the City and the environment,” he said.

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