Contact: Joe Vargo, Perris Public Information Officer
Phone: 951-956-2120
jvargo@cityofperris.org

Perris Lawns Go Green

Dave Milligan examines a neglected lawn with bare spots before treating it with a dye as part of Perris’ program to improve the curb appeal and aesthetics of distressed homes
Dave Milligan examines a neglected lawn with bare spots before treating it with a dye as part of Perris’ program
to improve the curb appeal and aesthetics of
distressed homes.

Lawns are going green in Perris neighborhoods challenged by current home foreclosure crisis.

The City has hired a contractor to trim and edge the lawns of distressed residences and then apply a special, eco-friendly dye to maintain their curb appeal and aesthetics.

It’s part of a pilot project and one of several examples of how Perris is aggressively meeting the economic slump head-on.

Contractor Dave Milligan recently tackled several brown lawns on one street in the City’s Villages of Avalon development. His crew descended on the block early in the morning to help restore the appearance of the residences, which will also help lift the looks of the entire street.

Milligan, who calls the process “lawn colorization,” praised Perris’ efforts to address the challenges facing neighborhood blight.

Foreman Bruce Cooney applies the dye to a residence in Perris’ north end
Foreman Bruce Cooney applies the dye to a residence in Perris’ north end.

In addition to the lawn maintenance program, the City is using its financial resources to help homebuyers make their down payments and helps existing property owners pay for improvements to their homes. All together, the City is spending more than $2 million to help stabilize Perris neighborhoods.

“They definitely have a can-do attitude,” Milligan said. “This is a pilot project and the City has been very cooperative.”

The work begins when Milligan’s crew mows, trims and edges each lawn. Then they fire up a generator and begin spraying a mist of green dye on the affected lawn. The dye dissolves in water and is harmless to people and pets. When applied properly, the dye will not run and should last up to six months, by which time the property hopefully will be purchased and occupied. A typical lawn can be mowed, trimmed and “greened” in about two or three hours. The average cost: about $550 per residence.

A lawn after being treated with the water soluble dye
A lawn after being treated with the water soluble dye.

Mayor Daryl Busch said the City remains committed to doing everything it can to preserve neighborhood stability and home prices until the economy turns around. Programs like Milligan’s are part of that effort.

“We are ready, willing and able to do whatever we can to improve the quality of life for our residents,” Busch said.

 

 

 

 

Video story that orignally aired on KTLA