Contact: Joe Vargo, Perris Public Information Officer
Phone: 951-956-2120
jvargo@cityofperris.org

Flooding Hazard at Mapes and Goetz Road is Fixed

Construction foreman Doug Nace points to a 36-inch drainage pipe that will carry water from the intersection to the San Jacinto River channel
Construction foreman Doug Nace points to a 36-inch drainage pipe that will carry water from the intersection to the San Jacinto River channel.

A pair of newly installed drainage pipes and an improved floodwater channel are expected to alleviate problems at a major intersection in the City’s south end known for chronically flooding during rainy weather.

Work continues at Mapes and Goetz roads as earth-movers cut the last portion of a drainage ditch designed to carry rainwater away from that busy intersection near the world-famous Perris Valley Airport.

The location has been a problem for many years as inadequate drainage during rainstorms allowed water to run across both roadways, which are heavily traveled by both car and truck traffic. During January’s heavy rains, the intersection became impassable.

Engineer Grant Becklund said work to improve the intersection began in mid-July and is expected to wrap up by the end of August.

A road-grader gouges out dirt to make a new drainage ditch to help end flooding at Mapes and Goetz roads. Ther Perris Valley Airport wind tunnel is in the background A road-grader gouges out dirt to make a new drainage ditch to help end flooding at Mapes and Goetz roads. Ther Perris Valley Airport wind tunnel is in the background.

Cost of the renovations is $533,000, which will be paid in full by revenues and transportation funds dedicated to funding road improvements.

“This will be a major upgrade to that intersection,” Becklund said. “It will prevent flooding and will make it safer for traffic.”

Perris City Councilman Mark Yarbrough said the renovations are part of a well-planned, long-range effort to upgrade City streets, an effort that continues despite the struggling economy. He said that providing the best possible roadways is a quality-of-life issue and one that the City is committed to maintaining.
Goetz Road has become a major traffic artery, linking the Ethanac Road corridor and Monument Ranch subdivision to Downtown Perris businesses.

“I am glad that the City is able to maintain this important and ongoing effort,” Yarbrough said.

City Councilwoman Joanne Evans said she is glad Perris took advantage of dedicated tax dollars to fund the project. She noted that millions of square feet of commercial development have been approved for the south end of Perris and the Goetz/Mapes intersection will play a vital role in circulating increased traffic in the coming years.

“There are a lot of major buildings planned for that part of the City,” Evans said.  “It’s critical to maintain and improve roads in that area of Perris.”

Becklund said improving flood control at Goetz/Mapes required several steps.

Contractors installed a 100-foot long, 36-inch diameter pipe on the west side of Goetz to replace a drainage culvert that had been crushed by age and usage. Then engineers installed a second, 70-foot section of 36-inch pipe running under Goetz Road and emerging on the east side into an earthen drainage channel. Finally, construction called for widening the channel all the way to the San Jacinto River bed, about 2,000 feet to the south.

Improvements also called for paving about 3,000-feet of Mapes between Goetz and A Street. Becklund said that road was last paved by Riverside County in the 1970s and badly needed improvements as heavy-truck traffic has increased dramatically as Perris grew in the last decade. Crews also repaved a section of Goetz at Mapes and installed turning lanes to improve the flow of traffic in both directions. They also removed several eucalyptus trees which impeded vision for motorists turning onto Mapes and Goetz roads.

Perris Mayor Daryl Busch said the City ordered the improvements now so they would be finished well in advance of the winter rainy season.

“It was a hassle with flooding and it posed potential safety hazards,” he said. “We have taken a bad situation and turned it into a good one.”