Contact: Joe Vargo, Perris Public Information Officer
Phone: 951-956-2120
jvargo@cityofperris.org

Treasures from Trash at Rob Reiner School

Perris Mayor Daryl Busch chats with Armani Guzman, Steven Davis and Alejandra Arellanes while visiting an art exhibit at the Rob Reiner Children and Families Development Center in the City.Perris Mayor Daryl Busch chats with Armani Guzman, Steven Davis and Alejandra Arellanes while visiting an art exhibit at the Rob Reiner Children and Families Development Center in the City.

Trash to treasure.

That was theme of the pre-schoolers at the Rob Reiner Children and Families Development Center who salvaged everyday household items from the trash bin and turned them into one-of-a-kind art pieces suitable for display and sale.

Popsicle sticks, plastic bags, plastic bottles and bottle caps, milk cartons, egg cartons and peanut butter jars all became the main ingredients for collages and multi-media art projects by the school’s 3 to 5-year-olds. Plastic wrapper became flowers. Juice cartons became birdhouses. Discarded bottles became insects and piggy banks. Newspapers were transformed into birds.

Perris Mayor Daryl Busch inspected the work this week.

His response: “Impressive.”

“Trash to Treasure” was the theme of the art project at the Rob Reiner Children and Families Development Center in Perris.“Trash to Treasure” was the theme of the art project at the Rob Reiner Children and Families Development Center in Perris.

“These youngsters are learning about art, the environment and recycling and they’re learning it at an age that will stay with them for the rest of their lives,” he said.”I’m impressed by what they’ve created. I’m more impressed with what they’ve learned.’

Rob Reiner director Carol Jimenez says that while most of the art work was created by the school’s students, parents helped out with some of the more elaborate designs.  Those canvas designs will be auctioned off to raise funds for supplies and field trips.

Jimenez said the art projects help youngster realize that items slated for the trash heap can be reused and made into something beautiful.

“It’s important to learn that you can reuse things in a new creative manner,” she said. “We live in a disposable culture where things don’t even get broken before they are replaced. We want to teach our children that things can be reused.”
Steven Davis, Armani Guzman and Alejandra Arellanes, who are 4-years-old, were three of the students who created artworks as part of the school project. They were among the students who created bugs, trucks, flowers, snowmen and cutout Christmas trees with the recyclables.

Center director Carol Jimenez explains how pre-schoolers rolled newspaper to create geometric designs for their art projects.Center director Carol Jimenez explains how pre-schoolers rolled newspaper to create geometric designs for their art projects.

Steven made a planter out of one of his old boots which he filled with pebbles. He enjoyed the project because he could “make something out of” items that would otherwise end up in the trash heap. Armani said he will keep his art project in his room. Alejandra used cotton balls and Styrofoam to craft a clown.  Armani turned green paper into a toy alligator. He plans to keep it.

“It’s going in my room,” he said.